Why YOU Should Be a Morning Person

One of the fondest, albeit characteristically quirky, memories of my childhood involves listening to my mom sing the “Good Morning Song” to my little sister:

Good morning, good morning, good morning,

It’s time to rise and shine!

Good morning, good morning, good morning,

I hope you’re feeling fine!

Come on, get up, get out of bed,

It’s time to get up you sleepyhead!

The day is shining just for you,

And all your dreams will come truuuuue! doo–doo–doo, doo-doo-dooooo!

You see, Sherie wasn’t exactly a morning person as a child. She took some coaxing. I used to delight in opening her bedroom door and encouraging the dog to jump on her head to startle her awake — mean, big sister style.

(Come to think of it, I still kind enjoy that)

Read any book on success or motivation and you’ll find that encouragement to rise early is a common thread — and it’s no accident. According to a study that appeared in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology, morning people are more likely to be successful for a variety of reasons. They usually perform better in school, get into better colleges, get better jobs, are more skilled at solving conflict and are usually more proactive in preventing problems. Morning folks also tend to be more cheerful and adaptive than their nocturnal counterparts.

The good news is that your chronotype – that is, the time of day when you’re most aware and active — is malleable. Chronotypes are partly based on genetics and play a strong role in determining an individual’s levels of “morning-ness” or “evening-ness.” While some folks are naturally early risers, even the nightiest of night owls (like that?) can reset their circadian rhythms to encourage waking earlier. Just do it gradually if you’re currently a night person — don’t expect to go from rising at noon to waking up at 5am in a couple of days. Especially if you don’t want to end up in prison for murder.

Extreme? Maybe. But I know how cranky your night folks can be in the mornings.

The morning is a great opportunity to plan your day, lay out your goals, pray, meditate or do whatever you need to do to prepare yourself to take on the day. It’s a chance to charge yourself up emotionally and spiritually. And think about it — rising early gives you an immediate edge over anyone else who is still laying in bed asleep long after you’ve gotten your day started. If you’re like me, that’s quite a bit of incentive in itself. I play to win, so I’ll take every advantage I can.

Here’s the key though: make careful use of the extra time you credit yourself with by waking up earlier. Pouring a cup of coffee and spending two hours surfing the internet or reading an escape novel doesn’t really count. Be productive. In time, rising early will become natural and you’ll feel so much more accomplished at the end of each day.

 

One comment

  1. “Make careful use of the extra time you credit yourself with by waking up earlier. Pouring a cup of coffee and spending two hours surfing the internet or reading an escape novel doesn’t really count. Be productive.” Great stuff!